Public Lab Research note


Analizing the signal of the Coqui using Audacity

by imvec | June 11, 2018 17:34 | 239 views | 4 comments | #16465 | 239 views | 4 comments | #16465 11 Jun 17:34

Read more: i.publiclab.org/n/16465


What I want to do

Determine the frequency of the generated wave of a Coqui device.

My attempt and results

AUDIO FILE → LS_51372.ogg

After recording the signal from a Bezoya bottled water and adding some salty water to it we've imported the file into Audacity. Getting this general wave.

bezoya.png

Analizing a part of the wave

We've selected 1/2 second of the lowest signal (Bezoya water). You can do it directly on the timeline using the cursor or at the bottom of the interface.

selection.png

Once selected, on the top menu go to "Analyze → Plot spectrum". For our low part of the wave we've got this curve.

low.png

For the high part of the wave (the salty water) this is the result.

high.png

Audacity has a lot of different patterns of analisis and options. Play around with it.

Questions and next steps

Use a know conductivity product and... modify the coqui with a potentiometer to "tune" this known conductivity signal to a musical note?¿ Would it be possible?


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4 Comments

Very cool!!!! Haha for those new here, it's the Coquí, not the frog!

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hahhahahah!!! added link to the very first line ;D

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I had seen a post on Instagram a while back of people measuring the pulses from a Coqui using an Arduino... but i was thinking more about this and have been trying to use a guitar tuning app... only semi-successfully!

http://guitar-tuner.appspot.com doesn't seem to work... i tried some apps too. The ideal would be to get a concrete measurement of frequency, but i wonder if the Coqui is often outside the range many apps would listen...? Or it's pretty quiet... I'd love it folks tried this out and reported back in!

I'll post a question!

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