Question: Can I use a single camera with RGB and extended NIR to capture NDVI?

SimonKirkman88 is asking a question about general: Follow this topic

SimonKirkman88 asked on November 05, 2019 22:04
119 views | #21404


I am currently trying to build a 'low cost' NDVI sensor for a university dissertation. I am in the beginning stages and my initial idea was to use an RGB image and an NoIR image and combine the 2 but it comes with its own set of challenges. Is it possible to. Use an NIR sensitive camera to take the image and then use take the red and the NIR as two separate copies of the same image and merge them instead?



3 Comments

Is this a question? Click here to post it to the Questions page.

Reply to this comment...


`>>Is it possible to use an NIR sensitive camera to take the image and then use the red and the NIR as two separate copies of the same image and merge them instead?

This is only possible if one of the channels (RGB) receives no visible light and therefore records only NIR light. So a filter must block all light of one color and transmit NIR. The recommended filter is one that blocks all blue so the blue channel captures only NIR light.

This solution has a serious flaw because the other two channels will also record NIR light along with the visible light that is normally recorded. It is not straightforward to determine what proportion of the light recorded in those channels is visible vs. NIR.

This problem of contamination is avoided by using two cameras. It is easy to place a filter in front of an NIR sensitive camera so only NIR light is captured (in all three channels). A separate normal camera can capture a normal photo in which the red channel will record primarily red light. Using two cameras requires registering (aligning) two photos, but this can be done very effectively with free software. The results can be excellent if parallax is minimized by keeping the two lenses close together and far from the subject (or moving the lenses so they alternately occupy the same position).

With either single or dual-camera systems, calibration is required to convert the brightness values (0-255) into an estimate of radiance (energy). Brightness values recorded by cameras differ from radiance because cameras are not radiometers and also because camera sensors are not equally sensitive to visible and NIR light.

Chris

Is this a question? Click here to post it to the Questions page.

Reply to this comment...


It should be quite straight forward. My suggestion is to purchase a full spectrum converted high quality camera and add different filters for selecting desired spectral ranges. For example, you can take the "normal" picture with a IR blocking filter and then switch to an IR pass filter for the same scene, provided that the object is stationary.

If you use a converted Nikon camera, you will have a wide selection of lens to choose from and take advantage of the autofocus and to a less degree, the auto exposure system. A full spectrum converted Nikon D70 body cost $150 on eBay.

Reply to this comment...


Log in to comment